Writer’s Quote: Ella wheeler Wilcox

Writer’s Quote: Ella wheeler Wilcox

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I found the above quote while scrolling through my twitter feed and had to share it. Why? Because the atrocities going on in this world are so much that we may sometimes forget there is kindness in this world,

Because, young girls are dying and children are dying. Because, the current generation which are the future are grieving; they’re mourning; their innocence dimming as they see murder  happening around them everyday, it may as well be classified as normal. Because the upcoming generation, and not just those growing up in Syria or Iran or Kashmir, but all around the world- in Nigeria, in Turkey, in Bangladesh, in Palestine, in the United Kingdom, in the states, deserve to have a sky devoid of air strikes, a crowd devoid of bomb blast. They deserve to have peace.

I hope to convey my emotions by sharing the following poem by Ella wheeler Wilcox as my writer’s quote/poem Wednesday submission. I may not be in the North-Eastern part of Nigeria where the boko-haram insurgency has crippled their inhabitants, I may not be in Syria and Palestine where their lives are under constant terror and little seems to be done about it, I may not be in the United Kingdom where a coward of person takes the lives of innocent citizens. But in the words of Ella Wheeler, I echo your cries and I echo your sorrows.

The little white hearse by Ella wheeler Wilcox

Somebody’s baby was buried to-day–
The empty white hearse from the grave rumbled back,
And the morning somehow seemed less smiling and gay
As I paused on the walk while it crossed on its way,
And a shadow seemed drawn o’er the sun’s golden track.

Somebody’s baby was laid out to rest,
White as a snowdrop, and fair to behold,
And the soft little hands were crossed over the breast,
And those hands and the lips and the eyelids were pressed
With kisses as hot as the eyelids were cold.

Somebody saw it go out of her sight,
Under the coffin lid–out through the door;
Somebody finds only darkness and blight
All through the glory of summer-sun light;
Somebody’s baby will waken no more.

Somebody’s sorrow is making me weep:
I know not her name, but I echo her cry,
For the dearly bought baby she longed so to keep,
The baby that rode to its long-lasting sleep
In the little white hearse that went rumbling by.

I know not her name, but her sorrow I know;
While I paused on the crossing I lived it once more,
And back to my heart surged that river of woe
That but in the breast of a mother can flow;
For the little white hearse has been, too, at my door.

Source: https://www.familyfriendpoems.com/poem/the-little-white-hearse-by-ella-wheeler-wilcox

Writer’s Quote: Cornelius Eady

Writer’s Quote: Cornelius Eady

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One of the things I enjoy doing during my free time is watching poetry recited out loud on YouTube. I don’t mean spoken word poetry, I mean those classical poems by Maya angelou, Emily Dickinson, Langston Hughes e.t.c. Watching them being recited adds more meaning to the poems, and increase in my understanding and love for the poems and poetry as a whole. It’s during one such occasion, I first heard the poem- I’m a fool to love you by Cornelius Eady. That poem touched me deeply; it spoke to me in ways many poems don’t and that’s why today I decided to share it with you guys for Writers Quote/Poem Wednesday.

I know I am not done with my AtoZ challenge and it’s already May, will try to roundup soon, the letter X is really not inspiring. Below is the poem

I’m a fool to love you- Cornelius Eady

Some folks will tell you the blues is a woman,
Some type of supernatural creature.
My mother would tell you, if she could,
About her life with my father,
A strange and sometimes cruel gentleman.
She would tell you about the choices
A young black woman faces.
Is falling in love with some man
A deal with the devil
In blue terms, the tongue we use
When we don’t want nuance
To get in the way,
When we need to talk straight.

My mother chooses my father
After choosing a man
Who was, as we sing it,
Of no account.
This man made my father look good,
That’s how bad it was.
He made my father seem like an island
In the middle of a stormy sea,
He made my father look like a rock.

And is the blues the moment you realize
You exist in a stacked deck,
You look in a mirror at your young face,
The face my sister carries,
And you know it’s the only leverage
You’ve got.
Does this create a hurt that whispers
How you going to do?
Is the blues the moment
You shrug your shoulders
And agree, a girl without money
Is nothing, dust
To be pushed around by any old breeze.
Compared to this,
My father seems, briefly,
To be a fire escape.
This is the way the blues works
Its sorry wonders,
Makes trouble look like
A feather bed,
Makes the wrong man’s kisses
A healing.

D- Dylan Thomas

D- Dylan Thomas

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It’s writer’s quote/ Poem Wednesday again. In correlation with the A-Z challenge going on, I chose to share a quote and poem by a writer whose name begins with letter D and that person is Dylan Thomas. Below is one of the most popular poems of his.

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on that sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

This is a scheduled post. I am away at the moment; take care and happy reading .

Writer’s Quote: Mother to son

Writer’s Quote: Mother to son

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It’s Wednesday, which means, it’s time for writers quote Wednesday again. Today, I picked the quote above that speaks about “giving up”, which is a topic I believe is timely and cannot be said enough. The poem I chose to go with the quote is one by one  of my favourite poets, Langston Hughes. 

The poem is about a conversation between a mother and her son; it’s actually a one sided conversation, with the mother doing all the talking and the son, I envision, is taking it all in, in silence. A scene I am all  too familiar with, but I digress. Below is the poem, 

Mother To Son by Langston Hughes

Well, son, I’ll tell you:
Life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.
It’s had tacks in it,
And splinters,
And boards torn up,
And places with no carpet on the floor—
Bare.

But all the time
I’se been a-climbin’ on,
And reachin’ landin’s,
And turnin’ corners,
And sometimes goin’ in the dark
Where there ain’t been no light.

So, boy, don’t you turn back.
Don’t you set down on the steps.
‘Cause you finds it’s kinder hard.
Don’t you fall now—
For I’se still goin’, honey,
I’se still climbin’,
And life for me ain’t been no crystal stair.

Don’t feel shy to share your thoughts on the poem and let me know if you are already familiar with the Poem. 

Writer’s Quote: Personal

Writer’s Quote: Personal

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I was planning on skipping this week’s writers quote post because it has been a roller coaster kind of week, as evidenced by my lack of posts. But then, something happened today which I took personally. I know I shouldn’t take it personal because it’s really that small, but guess what, I am human and it hurt me and I took it personally. It’s almost midnight so hopefully, tomorrow, I wouldn’t feel the same way. But for now, here is a poem by Tony Hoagland titled Personally

Don’t take it personal, they said;
but I did, I took it all quite personal—

the breeze and the river and the color of the fields;
the price of grapefruit and stamps,

the wet hair of women in the rain—
And I cursed what hurt me

and I praised what gave me joy,
the most simple-minded of possible responses.

The government reminded me of my father,
with its deafness and its laws,

and the weather reminded me of my mom,
with her tropical squalls.

Enjoy it while you can, they said of Happiness
Think first, they said of Talk

Get over it, they said
at the School of Broken Hearts

but I couldn’t and I didn’t and I don’t
believe in the clean break;

I believe in the compound fracture
served with a sauce of dirty regret,

I believe in saying it all
and taking it all back

and saying it again for good measure
while the air fills up with I’m-Sorries

like wheeling birds
and the trees look seasick in the wind.

Oh life! Can you blame me
for making a scene?

You were that yellow caboose, the moon
disappearing over a ridge of cloud.

I was the dog, chained in some fool’s backyard;
barking and barking:

trying to convince everything else
to take it personal too.

Have you ever taken things personally when it’s probably trivial and you know you shouldn’t take it personal too?

The above image is courtesy of Behappy.me

Am I a writer?

Am I a writer?

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Somedays, words flow from the tip of my fingers, sprouting springs whose waters seem to last forever. somedays, the pool dries up, leaving no trace behind ever, of the presence of water. And I wonder, am I writer?

Somedays, tears form lumps in my throat, stuck, at the tentacle of falling out, transforming into anger on pages. Somedays, they descend in torrential downpour forming cavities upon my face and dampening blank pages. And I stare at the glistening droplets, am I a writer?

Somedays, memories come knocking on the door of present. I hold the door open, only slightly, letting it walk in a sequential pattern, straight through the ink across paper. Somedays, they come knocking down my door, and my hands hang helpless to their force. They form muddles around my mind, and I wonder, can I be a writer?

Somedays I edit, most days I erase, on occasion I delete the words I had previously placed. Somedays it takes everything within to choose to write, somedays writing chooses me, like I’ve been doing it all my life- it seems. And I wonder, what It takes to stake a claim on being a writer? 

The above image is courtesy of The odyssey online.com

writer’s Quote: Solitude-

writer’s Quote: Solitude-

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For the first writer’s quote of February, I chose an author whose poems I only recently became familiar with recently- Ella wheeler Wilcox. There, I gave out the author’s name already so no worries. There is no quiz this week. The title of the poem is Solitude.

Laugh, and the world laughs with you;
Weep, and you weep alone;
For the sad old earth must borrow its mirth,
But has trouble enough of its own.

Sing, and the hills will answer;
Sigh, it is lost on the air;
The echoes bound to a joyful sound,
But shrink from voicing care.

Rejoice, and men will seek you;
Grieve, and they turn and go;
They want full measure of all your pleasure,
But they do not need your woe.

Be glad, and your friends are many;
Be sad, and you lose them all,—
There are none to decline your nectared wine,
But alone you must drink life’s gall.

Feast, and your halls are crowded;
Fast, and the world goes by.
Succeed and give, and it helps you live,
But no man can help you die.

There is room in the halls of pleasure
For a large and lordly train,
But one by one we must all file on
Through the narrow aisles of pain.

The verses of the poem were culled from Poetry foundation and the above image quote is courtesy of Quotesfancy.com

Writer’s Quote: How frail the heart must be-

Writer’s Quote: How frail the heart must be-

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For this week’s writer’s quote, I want to try something different. But of course, it requires you guys to play along. So, last time, I shared the poem “thoughtless cruelty” by Charles Lamb. This week, what I’m going to do is share a poem and leave it up to you guys to guess the author. Are you ready? Okay.

The author wrote the poem below at the bare age of fourteen. I am almost 21 and I can only hope to write as good as that some day. When the author was asked regarding the poem, she said “Once a poem is made available to the public, the right of interpretation belongs to the reader”. I absolutely agree with that. Here is the poem below:

I thought that I could not be hurt;
I thought that I must surely be
impervious to suffering-
immune to pain
or agony.

My world was warm with April sun
my thoughts were spangled green and gold;
my soul filled up with joy, yet
felt the sharp, sweet pain that only joy
can hold.

My spirit soared above the gulls
that, swooping breathlessly so high
o’erhead, now seem to brush their whir-
ring wings against the blue roof of
the sky.

(How frail the human heart must be-
a throbbing pulse, a trembling thing-
a fragile, shining instrument
of crystal, which can either weep,
or sing.)

Then, suddenly my world turned gray,
and darkness wiped aside my joy.
A dull and aching void was left
where careless hands had reached out to
destroy

my silver web of happiness.
The hands then stopped in wonderment,
for, loving me, they wept to see
the tattered ruins of my firma-
ment

(How frail the human heart must be-
a mirrored pool of thought. So deep
and tremulous an instrument
of glass that it can either sing,
or weep).

As I asked at the beginning, who do you know write the poem? Looking forward to your answers in the comments, come on, don’t hide your knowledge. 🙂

Writer’s Quote: Gilda Radner

Writer’s Quote: Gilda Radner

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I wanted a perfect ending, now I’ve learnt the hard way, that some poems don’t rhyme and some stories don’t have a clear beginning, middle and end. Life is about not knowing, having to change, taking the moment and making the best of it without knowing what’s going to happen next. Delicious Ambiguity.
-Gilda Radner

I find that there is something beautiful in not knowing- it leaves room for hope and as Emily Dickinson famously wrote, “Hope is a thing with feathers”.

It’s being honest in admitting, yeah, at times we chase perfection. We want that perfect scenario, the perfect family, perfect kids, perfect draft (though I’m not sure how realistic I’m being here) and it is okay to want that.

In the chase of perfection, we shouldn’t become blind to the reality that perfection is a relative term. Not all poems that rhyme are perfect and not all perfect poems rhyme- I hope I’m making sense. And if I’m not, take it as this- you could lose your senses chasing perfection.

At the end of the day, what you’d remember most of all, what would fill the bulk of your memory is not the ending or the look of the book once you’ve written that final sentence, but the journey it took to get there. The mishaps, the spilled coffee, the messy desks and Pajama writing; it’s the smiles that curve on your lips when you recall how you ditched a friend simply because you needed to edit that first horrible draft; it’s the days when the muse decides to be your best friend and you write for all you are worth and the days when the muse takes a break and you wonder if surely, you are a writer?!

In the journey of chasing perfection, it’d do us a lot of good to remember, A perfect puzzle piece is in fact, made up of many imperfect and irregular pieces fitted together, without which it wouldn’t be possible.

This post is in response to Writer’s Quote Wednesday Writing Challenge

Writer’s Quote: Enid Blyton

Writer’s Quote: Enid Blyton

 

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One of my Guilty pleasures is reading Enid Blyton’s books. I have a feeling, it doesn’t matter how old I get, I would always find pleasure in immersing myself in her fictional school life.

Her books, Malory Towers and St Clare’s which are about life in an English Girls boarding school are full of wisdom, advice and a lot of inspirational quotes like the one above. You meet so many different and realistic characters on the way- it is a journey.

There’s the sensible Sally, the hot tempered Darrel, the joker Alicia who’s best friend Betty isn’t much better either. There’s the scatterbrain Irene, the conceited Mavis, the Horse-mad Bill, the shy Mary Lou, the french carefree Claudine and a whole array of other interesting characters.

Reading these books, you learn about responsibility and what it means to be a team. You learn that being smart and top in class are all good things, but being sensible, responsible and kind hearted people are equally important. You learn, it doesn’t matter how rich your parents are or how angelic you look on the outside, as long as the inside is rotten. You learn that being spiteful gets you nowhere in life. You learn lessons that’d stay with you for the rest of time.

And that’s it for this week’s Writer’s quote Wednesday writing challenge , hosted by SilverThreading and RonovanWrites. Till next time 😄