Writer’s Quote: Langston Hughes

Writer’s Quote: Langston Hughes

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February 1st marks the beginning of a month, we the singles like to overlook because of a certain event happening on the 14th. But, it is also the day poet and social activist Langston Hughes was born. If you are looking for a poem with sass, rhyme, humor and meaning all bound together, then Langston’s poem is the go to. He is one of those authors whose poems I could binge on. Langston Hughes wrote about slavery and racism at a time when it was prevalent in the society and speaking up against them was risky, yet he dared. Just like the quote above, he used his gift of writing to urge the world towards change.

On May 22, 1967, Hughes died in New York City from complications after abdominal surgery related to prostrate cancer, at the age of 65 (acc to Wikipedia). Below, is another piece of his.

“The night is beautiful,
So the faces of my people.

The stars are beautiful,
So the eyes of my people

Beautiful, also, is the sun.
Beautiful, also, are the souls of my people.”

             -“My People” in The Crisis (October 1923)

The above post is in response to writer’s quote Wednesday hosted by Silver Threading

Writer’s Quote: Matthew G. Gubler

Writer’s Quote: Matthew G. Gubler

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Meet Mathew Gray Gubler. Some of you may know him as the genius FBI agent on Criminal Minds, Dr Spencer Reed. He is also involved in another aspect of creative arts other than acting/directing – Painting, to be more precise.

As the popular saying goes, “you may be the ripest peach in the garden, yet there’ll be someone who hates peaches”. In life, criticism is bound to follow. We can sit all day doing nothing and still be criticized for doing just that. Chasing our dreams is only going to increase the force of criticism. Certain things can’t be escaped, but our perspective of them goes a long way in how we deal with them- criticism is one of such things. If we could employ the advice of Matthew Gray Gubler, and just for a moment, envision criticism to be the beautiful creation he described it to be, it might be a whole lot easier to deal with.

Taking criticism by the hand and viewing it through rose colored glasses is not an easy task. But then again, it’s also not impossible. Bad days happen; negative comments have the tendency to strike just the right nerve; it hurts when hard work is viewed as everything less. We can’t control people’s words towards us but we can control to some extent, our reaction to them.
Next time we are hit with the close fisted criticism, lets try to imagine the words of our criticizers (as hard as it is), as nothing more than incentives towards a colorful masterpiece. And if that doesn’t work out, I say, sleep on it. Yup, some days, all the wisdom of inspirational words can only do so much without that much needed sleep, if we are being realistic. Sleep, and hopefully, the new day would bring a brighter perspective.

This post is in response to Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by Silver Threading.

Writer’s Quote: Meredith Gray

Writer’s Quote: Meredith Gray

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Humans have a tendency to want to give up when the doors are closing and it seems like the roof is caving in. This tendency culminates into some people actually giving up and the others deciding to try just once more. Not everyone who tries again is going to achieve their desired goal. The difference between those who tried yet again and those who didn’t is, for the latter, it’s always going to be at the back of their mind like a nightmare which refuses to back away, the question- what would life had been like if they had given it one more shot. And the answer is, they’d never know.

Rejection is bad, but regrets, they can eat at the soul. This doesn’t mean that I’ve never ran through the slit opening of a door when I realized it was closing; trust me, I have had my fair share of running, giving up and regretting. But, I’m working at making that attitude a thing of the past. Will it be easy? Absolutely not, but I have a feeling I’d go to bed feeling much better knowing I gave it one more shot.

Here’s to writing meaningless sentences till we finally get the inspiration to write the meaningful ones. Here to rhyming words like “the cat sat on a hat” until the rhymes take a world of their own. Here’s to giving our best shots in hopeless situations.

P.S, what are your favorite gray’s anatomy quotes?

This post in response to Writer’s quote Wednesday by hosted by Silver Threading.

Writer’s Quote: Maya Angelou

Writer’s Quote: Maya Angelou

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Whenever I post a Maya Angelou quote, I don’t like writing much under it because her words are sufficient and have such profound wisdom in them, I feel anything I write would be subliminal. It’s been over a year since Dr. Maya passed away but her words live on as a source of inspiration and that’s the strength of writing. Her poems are a testament of a woman who went through fierce storms but didn’t let them cloud the shine in her rainbow. You read her works like, phenomenal woman and Still I rise and you can almost hear the sass in her voice as you sift through the words, savoring every sentence, every line, every verse.

I chose the above quote because it’s a reminder of something we are in desperate need of, all across the globe. We are in dire need of peace, but in order to attain it, we have to be unified; we have to be color blind; we have to realize we are more alike than we are unalike.

We’ve all got our struggles and just because they are different doesn’t make them any less of a torment than any other persons. I read recently about the importance of writers support groups. There are days as writers where we’ll feel like “we just can’t do it anymore”. You know who’s going to be there in our corners, pushing us on, those writers who have once sailed across the turbulence. They’ve been there and crossed it, it wasn’t easy but they did it. They are the ones who’d help paddle our boats across the storms, being our support systems when our creative juices clog.

A big thank you to everyone who has participated in writer’s Quote this year and has been a source of inspiration to me and also to Colleen from SilverThreading, for hosting this event In the first place. That’s it, and see you in 2016, God willing.

Writer’s Quote: Daphne Du Maurier

Writer’s Quote: Daphne Du Maurier

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I was talking to an old friend today and explained how I wanted a two weeks break from school and stress without having to make any plans or be compelled to visit anyone. Just me, with my girls and our books and cups of tea, chilling, relaxing and watching episodes of criminal minds. He didn’t get it.

There is a certain contentment, an aura of calmness, when you’re with the ones you love and doing what you love to do- reading and writing; many people I have come across don’t understand it, but the truth is, it is NOT for them to understand. We’re happy, relaxed and for a few days, enjoying the silence, isn’t that all that matters. They assume it is a boring life, but actually, there is nothing more interesting than being with like minded people, surrounded by books and stories with amazing characters or challenging one’s self creatively.

Happiness isn’t defined by luxury, it is a state of mind- whether in a glass house or in wooden one. I once read, a few years back that Poets are sad people. For a while I believed it; but now I’ve come to realize just because some write-ups are fueled by sad emotions doesn’t mean ‘current sadness”. Writing it out is just like crying, letting the negativity out in order to create space for the happiness yet to come, and to me that’s not being sad; that’s dealing with life.

Cheers to everyone who enjoys reading and writing either in luxury or simplicity. This world is big enough for both categories.

This post is in response to Writer’s Quote Wednesday hosted by a Silver Threading.

Writer’s Quote: Erin Hanson

Writer’s Quote: Erin Hanson

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And then, there are writers like Erin Hanson. She is a twenty year old Australian (according to google) with hands that weave magic in form of poetic words. I initially came across her works on Pinterest and noticed her initials were E.H . I automatically assumed they meant “Ernest Hemmingway” due to the wisdom and flawlessness of her words. I was quite impressed by Hemmingway, for walking in the skin of a girl and writing from the female point of view for a lot of the poems. Turns out, it was actually written by a female named Erin.

Erin Hanson is one of the few modern poets I enjoy, a second is lang Leav. Every single one of her poems, leaves a message with me. When I hit that dry spell of writing, her words are an inspiration. I find myself thinking, it’d be nice to be as good as her; plus another bonus, she rhymes. If you’ve written poetry before, you’d know it’s not an easy feat to make complete sense, all the time, and still rhyme. Erin Hanson makes it work and I admire her for that.
She has also released a book titled: “The Poetic Underground” which is available on Amazon. Without further adieu, after talking the talk, here’s a poem of hers to walk the talk.

You can write for hours on hours,
Of all the things you wish you could be,
But the truth of the matter is simple,
People are not poetry,
And I know that you wish you weren’t awkward,
That sweet words could roll right off your tongue,
But your time here’s too short just to worry,
How each single sentence is strung,
It’s okay to be rough round the edges,
To be bruised up and broken and scarred,
But it’s not okay to let people tell you,
That it’s a reason to change who you are,
Your hair doesn’t always seat nicely,
The way a poem sits so neatly on line,
And sometimes you might feel like a word,
That nobody has learnt to define,
You might not be a star that lights darkness,
Or a bird that can teach us to soar,
But it’s okay, because you’re too complex,
To be crammed into one metaphor,
It’s okay not to know what you’re doing,
Since your feelings don’t have to all rhyme,
Though a poem once complete is eternal,
You have the freedom to change over time,
You’re much more than can ever be written,
There is no title to say, “This is me”,
You can’t be trapped in the lines of a notebook,
Because people are not poetry.

This post is In response to Writers Quote Wednesday, hosted by Silver Threading.

Writer’s Quote: Emily Dickinson

Writer’s Quote: Emily Dickinson

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It’s not often we get the pleasure of an Emily Dickinson’s poem without the metaphor or in depth meaning. Just plain ole simplicity with clear cut message. I was glad I came across the above words of hers on Pinterest this week.

We get so busy, writing, reading, working, making a living; we get carried away, trying to smoothen the rough tracks of our lives and all it takes sometimes, Is a smile on the face of one person to remind us to breathe, even if only for a second. All it takes, is a smile on the face of a stranger to get the wires in our brain to pause from it’s activity and let our face muscles relax to return the gesture. We know a kind word can do a lot, but forget that a smile can do a lot too.

Receiving a smile from a loved one makes us feel good, but from a stranger or someone we just met, it gives us something to think about all through the day. And I’m not talking about those creepy stalker smiles we receive, I mean genuine smiles. When we stay too long at the cashier but the next person on the counter just smiles rather get angry, when we act ridiculously clumsy in public and receive a smile from the stranger across- that’s the kind I’m talking about.

I know, it’s that time of the year when the deadlines are looming. We’ve made a resolution to complete our novel and we’re only a few chapters through the first draft, exams are around the corner for some and end of the year activities are driving us nuts, bottom line is- we’re red neck busy. I just want us to remember that it takes little to smile. And when we do receive one, let’s try our best to pass it on, we never know who might need it. I know, a smile wouldn’t help to finish a novel, but it will help you feel better while completing it.


This post is in response to Writer’s Quote Wednesday. It’s great to be back blogging again and thank you for your wishes. 🙂

Writer’s Quote: Bruce Lee

Writer’s Quote: Bruce Lee

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This week’s inspiration is from Martial Arts legend, Bruce Lee, his above words speak to me. Writing is like any other art, in the sense that, it is honed with constant practice. When we write everyday, it might appear to us like nothing has changed. If ever we do look back at the written works gathered over time, the change in our writings become visible.

Bestsellers and masterpieces aren’t created overnight, it takes effort and research and lots of writing. It’s a process of trial and error. We write, we erase some paragraph and add sentences to some pargraphs. We are continuously writing and trying to outdo the previous and that “constant zeal” makes all the difference.

This post is in response to writer’s quote Wednesday.

Writer’s Quote: Neil Gaiman

Writer’s Quote: Neil Gaiman

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I hope that in this year to come, you make mistakes; because if you make mistakes, then you’re making new things, trying new things, learning, living, pushing yourself, changing yourself, changing your world. You’re doing things you’ve never done before, and more importantly, you’re doing something.
So that’s my wish for you, and all of us, and my wish for myself. Make new mistakes. Make glorious, amazing mistakes. Make mistakes nobody’s ever made before. Don’t freeze, don’t stop, don’t worry that it isn’t good enough, or it isn’t perfect, whatever it is: art or love or work or family or life. Whatever it is you are scared of doing, do it.
Make your mistakes, next year and forever
                   -Neil Gaiman

I was saving the above quote to share during the upcoming New year, but then, I thought, new year is a relative term. For some of us, a new year is far more represented by our “birthdays” rather than the first of January, some follow the Chinese calendar and some, the Islamic one. Today is as good a day to make a resolution as another day and the great part is, whatever resolutions we make beats the odd of not falling into the cliché uncompleted resolutions.

In life, we are advised to always think before we act and as good an advice as it is, we tend to take it a little more and spend all of our time thinking, rather than doing acting. And these seconds, minutes pass, the clock keeps ticking, while we, keep thinking. At the same time, we make resolutions like, “I’d start at Christmas” and then Christmas turns to new year, which turns to Eid and before we know it, the cycles gone round and we arrive at another Christmas with the same untouched goals we had a year back.

Today is the 30th, one more day and a new month begins. Here’s to making beautiful, amazing and glorious mistakes; to writing our worries and ignoring our fears; to completing our projects and changing ourselves; here’s to living and loving and writing away…

This post is in response to the weekly event Writer’s Quote Wednesday

Writer’s quote: Maya Angelou

Writer’s quote: Maya Angelou

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I’ve learned that no matter what happens, or how bad it seems today, life does go on and it will be better tomorrow.
I’ve learned that you can tell a lot about a person by the way he/she handles these three things: a rainy day, lost luggage and tangled christmas lights.
I’ve learned that regardless of your relationship with your parents, you’ll miss them when they are gone from your life.
I’ve learned making a “living” is not the same thing as making a “life”.
I’ve learned that life sometimes gives you a second chance.
I’ve learned that you shouldn’t go through life with a catcher’s mitt on both hands; you need to be able to throw something back.
I’ve learned that whenever I decide something with an open heart, I usually make the right decision.
I’ve learned that even when I have pains, I don’t have to be one.
I’ve learned that everyday you should reach out and touch someone. People love a warm hug, or just a friendly pat on the back.
I’ve learned that I still have a lot to learn.
I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.

The late Maya Angelou’s words are an inspiration and as writers, we are always on the lookout for inspiration. Life is a process of living and learning. Everyday, we see things, and sometimes we don’t realize the extent to which they impact us. We grow and learn from those things. And if we’re lucky enough, we get to write about them too.

Whenever the dreaded writers block creeps in, and my brain becomes a blank space, I look to personal experiences. I dig into an emotion, how it felt at a certain time, how an experience impacted me, and more often than not, the ink flows. In a way, it is like killing two birds of with one stone because on one hand, I have a piece completed and on the other hand, I get the opportunity of looking at those experiences through a new lens- through thought out words and not the irrational intensity of the emotion. As Maya Angelou said, we’ve learned and we still have a lot to learn. Here’s to learning and writing about them and learning some more.

This post is In response to Writer’s quote Wednesday. If you’d like to participate, just click on the highlighted link. IMAGE CREDIT: Counselling.org

Twitter: @WordsOfARandom